Global Leadership

Global Leadership


Changing organisation structures means there are now more global roles, and an increasing need for organisations to manage their leadership talent globally.

In a review of global leadership Sloan et al., (2003) mapped the types of leadership roles to competencies. Sloan concluded that many of competencies required for leaders in general were also important for global leaders. However a few more may be needed, and at a higher level. In some cases the general leadership competencies must be more fully developed to be effective in a global role, e.g., shaping strategy and influencing acorss cultures is more complex than across homogenous environments. These competencies are: 

 

  • Thought leadership – How to balance people, results, customers, and profits. Leaders must constantly make choices in style and priorities. Some situations call for more direction and collaboration. Others require fast decisions to address critical risks. The more global the role, the higher the complexity and volume of information the leader must consider.

 

  • Results Leadership – This is the planning, organizing and distributing of work through a complex organization. This is increasingly important for all leaders – but especially for global leaders.  Global leaders have to work across multiple organization levels and national boundaries, where there are cultural differences in preferences for structure and risk. This adds to the complexity.

 

  • People Leadership –  This is understanding individual differences in motivation, aspiration, and expectation. It is important for all leaders who deal with increasingly diverse workforces. For Global Leaders building relationships across distances, and cultures, face to face and remotely, are key challenges. It is imperitive to communicate well orally, and in writing, so that  words and tone will not be misinterpreted.

 

  • Self Leadership – This includes core characteristics that are not immediately visible, learning orientation, adaptability, integrity and values. It can be more culture bound, and not included in competency models. (This less visible element usually comes in to light during a scandal). This core element of effective and ethical leadership is important to ensure a good match between the individual and leaders values and those of the organization.

 

Discover how DavittCorporatePartners can help you to:

Develop Leadership in Your Organisation

Win the War for Talent

Realise Individual Potential

Align Behaviour with Corporate Values

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Leadership is a Conversation (cont)

Groysberg and Slind’s 4 elements of Organisational Conversation


 

Intimacy – How leaders relate to employees

Leaders must minimize the institutional, attitudinal, sometimes spatial distances between themselves and their employees. Mental or emotional proximity is essential. Leaders must be able to communicate personally and directly – they must value trust and authenticity enabling a move away from top town information flows towards bottom up exchanges of ideas. Conversational intimacy can become manifest in –Gaining trust – this  is often difficult to achieve and may mean addressing some topics that feel off limits. Listening well Leaders need to know when to stop talking and start listening. True attentiveness signals respect for people in all roles/levels of the business.

Interactivity – How leaders use communication channels

Interactions need to be open and fluid rather than closed and directive. Such open, two way dialogues will foster back to back, and face to face interactions which reinforce trust. Leaders can use video and social media tools to facilitate this two way direct, and informal communication. Employees must also have the tools and support to speak up (and where appropriate back)

Inclusion – How leaders develop organization content

This element of organizational conversation focuses on the employees’ role. Personal conversations are equal opportunity endeavors for employees as they  allow shared ownership of conversation content. A spirit of inclusion means that engaged employees can create the ideas and content themselves, and can actively participate in organizational messaging. Leaders involve employees in telling their company story, and enable them to act as brand ambassadors, and thought leaders

Intentionality- How leaders convey strategy

Rewarding personal conversations need to be open. However, they should not be aimless. Participants must have a purpose and agenda to what they want to achieve. Intentionality brings a measure of closure to the organizational conversation process. It requires leaders to convey strategic principles by explaining them, and by generating rather than enforcing consent.

 

 

 

 

To learn more about our services, please contact the office: +353-1-6688891 or info@davittcorporatepartners.com

Discover how DavittCorporatePartners can help you to:

Develop Leadership in Your Organisation

Win the War for Talent

Realise Individual Potential

Align Behaviour with Corporate Values

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

Leadership Is a Conversation

How should Leaders Manage Communication in their Organisations?


Globalisation and new technologies have reduced the viability and efficiency of traditional,  top-down approaches to management. There is now a real need for realistic and sophisticated model of leadership to replace  these command-and-control views.

The Organisational Conversation Model

Groysberg and Slind have developed a new “organisational conversation” model of leadership based on data over the last 2 years. Their sample of 150 includes professional communicators, and top leaders from over 100 diverse organisations ranging in size, industry, and sector. This Organisational Conversation Model emphasises how  leaders must move towards conversational processes to manage the flow of information to and from their employees. The research shows that  smart leaders:

  •  Engage with employees in ways  resembling regular person-to-person conversation
  • Initiate practices/ foster cultural norms that instill conversational sensibility in organisations, allowing growing companies to function like smaller ones.
  • Dont simply issue orders. This allows them to retain —operational flexibility, high employee engagement, tight strategic alignment among other performance indicators.

 

The model identifies four elements:

  • Intimacy
  •  Interactivity
  •  Inclusion
  • Intentionality (these will be discussed in the next blog).

 

 

 

 

To learn more about our services, please contact the office: +353-1-6688891 or info@davittcorporatepartners.com

Discover how DavittCorporatePartners can help you to:

Develop Leadership in Your Organisation

Win the War for Talent

Realise Individual Potential

Align Behaviour with Corporate Values

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________