Managing a Virtual Team

Managing Virtual Teams


 

When and how often do team members need to meet face-to-face (FTF)?

Maznevski et al found that FTF interaction is instrumental during the “forming” stages of team building, especially if team members do not know one another. However, it may also be advantegeous for team members to have completed some  initial virtual meetings before  meeting in person (team members can  then focus on task-related expertise before any potential biases are introduced, and the FTF meeting can  be used to establish team work practices).

Maznevski and Chudoba also  found that teams which have repeated  FTF meetings at predictable times/ intervals often outperform those who choose to meet as “needed”. Regular, predictible meetings promote effective time management, and enables individuals to reserve any complex/delicate issues for  in-person interactions.

What is the best technology solution for virtual teams?

Telephones and email  provide simple, reliable, and accessible communication.

How can managers coordinate work among dispersed members?

A study by Cramton  found that dispersed team members often lack a common, shared understanding. Hinds and Mortensen’s study on virtual teams also found that when people are distributed they tend to engage in relatively little of the spontaneous and informal “water-cooler” communication that promotes shared understanding and is often the vehicle for adaptation.

Managers of virtual teams must shift their teams’ work practices towards more structured coordination. Clear team-level work processes, output requirements, and group norms reduce the complexity of virtual team coordination from coordinating efforts across multiple sites to aligning one’s efforts with a single, consistent set of expectations. Second, managers must also work to support and facilitate dynamic adjustment when it’s required by promoting and encouraging informal interaction.

DavittCorporatePartners – Organisational Psychologists

To learn more about our Leadership Development services, please contact the office: +353-1-6688891 or info@davittcorporatepartners.com

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Building Effective Cross-Cultural Teams

Tips for Building Successful Cross Cultural Teams

Increase awareness of the challenges faced by team members from other cultures                                                                 

Individuals working as part of a multicultural team need to become aware, and understand the challenges which are often faced by team members from the non-dominant culture. This ranges from – appreciating the psychological challenges people can face to learning to interpret behavior from outside ones own cultural perspective.

Make explicit team norms                                                                                                                                                            

It is important for multicultural teams to explicitly discuss standards and expectations for effective communication within the team. Team members need to recognize that other  individuals on the team might be at risk for challenges in meeting these standards, based on their cultural upbringing, professional experience, and personality.

Work hard to create a psychologically safe and inclusive team environment                                                                                         

It is important to create anatmosphere within the team that is “psychologically safe.” Individuals who are from the non-dominant culture can feel intense pressure and scrutiny in multicultural team settings. It is critical that all individuals work hard to create an inclusive and supportive atmosphere for all team members of the team. Without such an atmosphere, teams can lose members who may have a great deal to add, but who struggle with the language and cultural norms.

Dedicate time and resources to skill building                                                                                                                                                            

Many multinational teams in today’s business environment have a culture that is essentially Western, and a language that is English. This creates problems for individuals who may lack the skills to be fully-participative members. Find a way to build and enhance your team members’ language and cultural skills.

To learn more about our Leadership Development services, please contact the office: +353-1-6688891 or info@davittcorporatepartners.com

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Mental Toughness

Mental Toughness


 

Mental toughness has been defined as the ability to perform at consistently high levels through times of personal and professional pressure (Jones et al.,2002)

Mentally tough individuals have ‘a high sense of self belief and an unshakable faith that they can control their own destiny, these individuals can remain relatively unaffected by competition and adversity’ (Clough et al., 2002)

 

Mental Toughness in the Workplace

Mental toughness is now considered by many as a key aspect of performance in the workplace for  building resiliance in individuals and teams, and enabling effective coaching and development. The growing interest in this concept of mental toughness as resulted from the assumptions that the characteristics underlying mental toughness are associate with increased performance and success.

Research has found that mental toughness (like emotional intelligence) is a characteristic that can be developed.  Clough et al.,  have proposed a 4C model of mental toughness to examine this concept in individuals.  The 4 Cs are:

  • Control  – the tendency to feel you are influential, and can control ones life.
  • Commitment – a tendency to involve oneself in an encounter, carry out tasks successfully despite problems, or obstacles.  
  • Challenge – the belief that life is changeable, it refers to the extent individuals see problems as opportunities rather than a threat.  
  • Confidence – a high sense of self- belief and unshakable faith concerning ones ability to achieve success.

 

To learn more about our Organisational Development services, please contact the office: +353-1-6688891 or info@davittcorporatepartners.com

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How to Use EQ to Lower Workplace Anxiety

Watch this short video of Dr. Martyn Newman on how to use EQ to reduce workplace anxiety

How to Use EQ to Reduce Workplace Stress



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Discover how DavittCorporatePartners can help you to:

Develop Emotional Intelligence in Your Organisation

Win the War for Talent

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Align Behaviour with Corporate Values

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DavittCorporatePartners – Organisational Psychologists and Experts in Building Emotional Intelligence

DCP at the EQ Summit 2012

DCP at the EQ Summit

DCP at the EQ Sumitt in London

DCP at the EQ Sumit in London

As sponsors of the 2012  EQ Summit we are delighted by the overall success of the day.  And, if you’ve been following our most recent blogs you will already have a general understanding of emotional intelligence – what exactly it means; what the fundamental components are; what value it can bring to organisations.

The EQ Summit in London offered a great forum for speakers to promulgate this message and showcase how they have used EQ as a methodology in organizations with great results. In particular, we heard from RocheMartin about their ECR (Emotional Capital Report), an assessment we also use with many of our clients. This ECR is a well developed EQ tool used in organisations to provide a basis for assessment, development, and coaching.

L-R Agneta Stranberg, Dr Paul Ekman, Judy Purse, Jody Bijary, Andrew Humphries

L-R Agneta Stranberg, Dr Paul Ekman, Judy Purse, Jody Bijary, Andrew Humphries, Dr Maryn Newman (standing at podium)

 

Without doubt, the highlight of the day was  the captivating, and informative talk given by eminent psychologist Dr Paul Ekman, whose work on micro-expressions and human emotions earned him a place in TIME Magazines Top 100 most influential people of 2009. After watching Ekman captivate the 400 person audience from a sitting position, it is easy to see how he gained this award in 2009.

To give you a feel of Dr Paul Ekman’s expertise and passion on this topic, please see the below video clip.

Dr Paul Ekman discusses Empathy

 

EQ Summit – 9th March

Blogs on the recent EQ Summit

Here are two excellent blogs on the recent EQ Summit in London

Thinking about Learning

&

Strategic HCM

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Discover how DavittCorporatePartners can help you to:

Develop Emotional Intelligence in Your Organisation

Win the War for Talent

Realise Individual Potential

Align Behaviour with Corporate Values

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DavittCorporatePartners – Organisational Psychologists and Experts in Building Emotional Intelligence

Positive Intelligence

Positive Intelligence

Research shows that when people work with a positive mind set their performance on nearly every level – productivity, creativity, engagement improves. People who cultivate a positive mind-set perform better in the face of challenge. For companies, happy employees mean better bottom-line results.

Happiness is the most misunderstood driver of performance, and whilst most people believe that success precedes happiness, happiness resulting from success is in fact fleeting.  Success is a moving target- as soon as you hit your target, you raise it again. Our general sense of well-being is surprisingly malleable. The habits we cultivate, our coworker interactions, and how we think about stress can all be managed to increase happiness.


Three ways individuals can cultivate their own sense of well being

Develop new habits. Recent research on neuroplasticity- the ability of the brain to change even into adulthood-reveals that as you develop new habits, you rewire the brain. Engage in one brief positive exercise every day for as little as three weeks.

Help your co-workers Many studies have found strong social support to be the greatest predictor of happiness during periods of high stress

Change your relationship with Stress. Stress is another factor contributing to people’s happiness at work.  Stress has an upside. Stress is not just an obstacle to growth; it can be the fuel for it. Your attitude toward stress can dramatically change how it affects you.

Discover how DavittCorporatePartners can help you to:

Develop Emotional Intelligence in Your Organisation

Win the War for Talent

Realise Individual Potential

Align Behaviour with Corporate Values

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DavittCorporatePartners – Organisational Psychologists and Experts in Building Emotional Intelligence

Social Skill

Social Skill

The first three components of emotional intelligence are self management skills. The last two, empathy and social skill, concern a person’s ability to manage relationships with others. As a component of emotional intelligence, social skill is not just a matter of friendliness, although people with high levels of social skill are rarely mean spirited. Social skill is friendliness with a purpose: moving people in the direction you desire.

Socially skilled people tend to have a wide circle of acquaintances, and are able to find common ground/build rapport with many groups of people. Such people have a network in place when the time for action comes.

Social skill is the culmination of emotional intelligence. People tend to be very effective at managing relationships when they can understand and control their own emotions and can empathize with the feelings of others. Even motivation contributes to social skill – people who are driven to achieve tend to be optimistic, even in the face of setbacks or failure. When people are upbeat, their “glow” is cast upon conversations and other social encounters.

Socially skilled people, are adept at managing teams; they are expert persuaders – a manifestation of self-awareness, self regulation, and empathy combined. Given those skills, good persuaders know when to make an emotional plea, for instance, and when an appeal to reason will work better.

Social skills allows leaders to put their emotional intelligence to work.

Discover how DavittCorporatePartners can help you to:

Develop Emotional Intelligence in Your Organisation

Win the War for Talent

Realise Individual Potential

Align Behaviour with Corporate Values

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DavittCorporatePartners – Organisational Psychologists and Experts in Building Emotional Intelligence

Emotions Make the World Go Round

Emotions Make the World go Round by Paul Ekman

Emotions determine the quality of our lives. They occur in every relationship we care about – the workplace, friendships, with family members, and in our intimate relationships. Emotions can, and often do begin very quickly. Our conscious self usually does not participate in or even witness what in our mind triggers an emotion at any particular moment. That speed can save our lives in an emergency, but it can also ruin our lives when we overreact. We don’t have much control or choice over what we become emotional about, but it is possible, though not easy, to make some changes in what triggers emotions and how we behave when we are emotional.

These words are from the introduction to my book Emotions Revealed, published after nearly 50 years of research. We knew very little about the nature of emotion when I began my research career. Unfortunately, much of what we have learned is still unknown by the general public, the professions or business community. We now know, but we didn’t know then, that seven emotions have a universal facial expression and vocal signal. Upbringing influences how and when and what triggers an emotion, but part of that is universal too. Ingrained habits, mostly learned early in life, operate automatically to manage emotional signals. We have found out a lot about, not just the emotion signals but the very nature of emotion, and what we have discovered can now be learned and used by others to obtain the emotional skills that my friend Danny Goleman hoped for when he wrote Emotional Intelligence in 1995 bringing this topic to public attention. It was the many requests from people who read Danny’s book and wanted to learn the skills he wrote about that stimulated me to translate my research into online training tools and workshops aimed at the business world as well as the law enforcement-national security community.

More information on these workshops as well as an opportunity to ‘test-drive’ the online tools will be available by the Paul Ekman Group at the 2012 Leadership & Emotional Intelligence Summit (www.eqsummit.com) to be held in London on March 9th in partnership with HR Magazine. Changing what we become emotional about and how we behave when we are emotional is harder to learn but that too is possible. Research by my colleague Martyn Newman at RocheMartin and our own work at Paul Ekman International and the Cultivation Emotional Balance program have demonstrated this convincingly. Our emotional world is about to change; we have not only the knowledge but the tools to have more constructive emotional engagements, more appropriate to the world we live in.

Paul Ekman is a psychologist and global pioneer in understanding emotions – named by Time Magazine as one of the Top 100 Most Influential People. He along with Martyn Newman, consulting psychologist and recognised international expert in emotional intelligence and leadership, will be headline presenters at the 2012 Leadership & Emotional Intelligence Summit in London on 9 March

Discover how DavittCorporatePartners can help you to:

Develop Emotional Intelligence in Your Organisation

Win the War for Talent

Realise Individual Potential

Align Behaviour with Corporate Values

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DavittCorporatePartners – Organisational Psychologists and Experts in Building Emotional Intelligence

Empathy

Empathy

Empathy is the most easily recognized dimension of emotional intelligence. It is the ability to understand the emotional makeup of other people. For a leader, empathy means thoughtfully considering other employees feelings in the process of making intelligent decisions (among other factors). Goleman notes that there are three types of empathy:

  • Cognitive Empathy– This involves understanding how the other people think, and expressing things in a way that impact on people.
  • Emotional Empathy-This is an unconscious ability, and ” is about feeling with…it has to do with a brain system called mirror nuerons which tune into the person we’re with and activate in our brain what they’re feeling, what they’re doing, what they’re intending”
  • Empathatic Concern– Leaders who possess this actually care and facilitate  their employees to be the best they can be.

 

Empathy is a particularly important component of leadership today. Why?

Increasing use of teams– Empathy allows leaders to understand a team’s emotional makeup. In teams a team leader must be able to sense and understand everyones’ viewpoints. They will listen to everyone in the group – what frustrates them, how they rate their colleagues, and whether they felt they had been ignored. Leaders must be able to direct the team in a way that brings them together, hence encouraging people to speak more openly about their frustrations, raise complaints during meetings.

Globalisation- Cross Cultural dialogue can easily lead to misunderstandings, and miscues. Leaders who have empathy are more attuned to subtleties’ in body language and can hear the message behind the words being spoken. Beyond that they have a deep understanding of both the existence and the importance of cultural and ethnic differences

Retention of talent- Leaders need empathy to develop and keep good people – when good people leave they take the company knowledge with them.

Discover how DavittCorporatePartners can help you to:

Develop Emotional Intelligence in Your Organisation

Win the War for Talent

Realise Individual Potential

Align Behaviour with Corporate Values

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DavittCorporatePartners – Organisational Psychologists and Experts in Building Emotional Intelligence